Posts Tagged With: 3

Gaffel Kölsch

Beer: Kölsch
Brewery:
Privatbrauerei Gaffel
Style: Kölsch
ABV: 4.8%

20130310_002141

Serving Style: Draft
Drinking Establishment: Pilsnerhaus, Hoboken, NJ
Primary Consumer: Kerensa

——–

OVERALL RATING:

BEERUSEBEERUSEBEERUSE

Sight: Clear golden body with no head. It looks like a generic macro lager ala Budwesier.

Smell: There’s an overwhelming aroma of watery pennies. That’s all I get.

Flavor: Oddly, it tastes like mozzarella and parmesan cheese, paired with a side of white bread and barley. I will issue the caveat that I am hungry and just saw a plate of Obatzda– a cheese spread–go by and would much rather be eating that than drinking this and thus there is a 15% chance that I am projecting my cheese spread desires onto this poor unknowing beer.

Feel: Thin with high carbonation.

Concluding Remark: Gaffel is a standard Kölsch from Cologne, but it’s somehow not as delicious as the Reissdorf despite being brewed to the same specs. To say it’s lacking complexity would be an understatement. As the Gaffel Brauerei states, it has a “light and refreshing taste that compliments almost all foods…it is superbly drinkable and subtle without being too filling.” While I might not go as far as to say that this is “superb,” and maybe by “subtle” they meant “the flavor is subtle, i.e. nearly undetectable,” the Gaffel Kölsch is a a Cologne favorite. I could be bribed to agree if presented with a plate of Obatzda in the next few minutes…

Advertisements
Categories: Kölsch | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Terrapin Big Hoppy Monster

Beer: Big Hoppy Monster
Brewery:
 Terrapin Beer Company
Style: Imperial Red Ale
ABV: 9.1%

20130226_213607

Serving Style: Bottle
Drinking Establishment: Chez Wood
Primary Consumer: Kerensa

——–

OVERALL RATING:

BEERUSEBEERUSEBEERUSE

Sight: Opaque, muddy brown body with a tiny, frothy head.

Smell: This is one of those beers that you can smell across a room. Despite its label, this Red Ale smells alarmingly akin to a Belgian Dubbel Ale, with its sugary, syrupy aroma with dried and rotting fruits of the raisin, prune, and fig variety. There is also a hint of port and caramelized caramel. So, what I’m saying is that this beer smells sweet.

Flavor: Well, this isn’t any Red Ale I recognize. Instead, it tastes like some sort of Porter-Belgian hybrid. The prominent flavors are bakers chocolate, burnt coffee, caramel, and figs. There is a bite from the high ABV and a subdued hop flavor–shocking, given it’s name (Big Hoppy Monster).

Feel: Medium, oily  body with moderate carbonation.

Concluding Remark: This 2 variations (Red and Amber) on 1 style (Amber) in 2 months (January & February) deal should end with an alcoholic bang. Terrapin’s Big Hoppy Monster, an oak-aged Imperial Red Ale, certainly fits that bill at 9.1% ABV. However, a Red Ale–a balanced ale that leans slightly in the hops direction–this is not. Perhaps Terrapin mislabeled this bottle? Instead of a bright, well-hopped ale, Big HOPPY Monster instead tastes like a highly alcoholic glass of dirt. The bakers chocolate paired with burnt coffee and whatever hops Terrapin used translates to the flavor of earth. Not EARTHY flavor, but literally, the taste of soil. It must be noted, though, that the OAK-AGED Big Hoppy Monster is different than the regular Big Hoppy Monster. An ale that is oak-aged will be sweeter and syrupy-er than it would be no-oak. I’d like to think that the Big Hoppy Monster actually tastes like a Red Ale.

At 9.1%, this beer has the highest ABV of the month. For that, I will forgive Terrapin for not serving a classical Red Ale. There is no such thing as a 9.1% classical Red Ale. While I’m missing the ‘Hoppy’ in Big Hoppy Monster, Terrapin delivers on the ‘Big’ and ‘Monster’ in Big Hoppy Monster. Despite the high ABV, it’s highly drinkable. However,  if you do find yourself with a bottle of this in hand, please remember that it is not characteristic of a Red Ale.

Stay tuned…we will be reviewing the BEST AMBER ALE AND BEER OF ALL TIME this weekend and announcing next month’s style on Monday!

malthop

Categories: Amber Ale, Red Ale | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Port Brewing Shark Attack

Beer: Shark Attack
Brewery:
 Port Brewing Brewing Company
Style: Imperial Red Ale
ABV: 9.0%

20130119_211051

Serving Style: Bottle
Drinking Establishment: Chez Wood
Primary Consumer: Kerensa

——–

OVERALL RATING:

BEERUSEBEERUSEBEERUSE

Sight: This is as murky as that pond you feared swimming in when you were a kid. It has a mahogany body with a huge sculptural head that leaves a thick lacing as it goes down the glass. An unsettling amount of yeast particulates hang in suspension.

Smell: The aroma is defined by the overwhelming smell of rubbing alcohol and bottom shelf liquor.

Flavor: Thankfully, the taste isn’t as off putting as its torturous smell. The flavors are an astringent bitterness from the hops. Hmm, that’s about it.

Feel: Medium body with tons of carbonation and a slight burning feeling from the high ABV.

Concluding Remark: Well, Port Brewing promises a “lethal amount of hops” that are still supposedly balanced by a “boat load of crystal malt.” The former is certainly true, though the latter…not so much. Eh. Overall, Port Brewing’s Shark Attack is more like a flounder bite. I’m pretty ambivalent about this beer.

malthop

Categories: Amber Ale, Red Ale | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

Flying Fish ESB Amber Ale

Beer: ESB Amber Ale
Brewery:
 Flying Fish Brewing Company
Style: American Amber Ale
ABV: 5.5%

20130209_221219

Serving Style: Bottle
Drinking Establishment: Chez Wood
Primary Consumer: Kerensa

——–

OVERALL RATING:

BEERUSEBEERUSEBEERUSE

Sight: Clear honey colored body with inch of a head that fizzles down to nothingness.

Smell: After dipping my nose into the glass, I’m reminded of nights drinking in German beer gardens. There is an initial Bavarian pretzel smell, which is quickly overpowered by a slightly sweet, astringent smell. No bueno. Tempting fate, I went in for one last sniff, and the lasting memory is rotting apple. For the chemists out there, this aroma is caused by acetaldehyde–a chemical produced during the yeast to booze conversion.

Flavor: My hopes of drinking a Bavarian pretzel were smashed upon first sip. Instead, the muddied flavors in this beer are corn, white toast, syrupy caramel, and pinch of grapefruit hops. If there wasn’t that a brightness from the citrus flavor, this beer would’ve been an incredible let down.

Feel: Thinnish body with moderate carbonation.

Concluding Remark: Well, to start, this beer isn’t a straight Amber Ale as its name implies. ESB Amber? Is that a thing? Should it be a thing? Well, it’s a thing (apparently). ESB–or Extra Special Bitter–is a slightly more alcoholic English-style pale ale. Despite it’s misleading name, ESBs are actually quite balanced…not so much bitter. As Amber Ales also usually strive for balance, this beer should be doubly balanced.

And the result of this hybrid? Well, it doesn’t taste like an Amber. Absent are the robust hops flavors, which are replaced with a pretty boring, generic English malt taste. This ale is mostly ESB, with little Amber representation. While wholly drinkable, there’s a whole lot of false advertising going on here.

For the record, Flying Fish describes this as a “classic British extra special bitter made fresh with an American slant.” I really don’t buy the American slant, but this is a decent American interpretation of a British classic. And, for another record, this is not an Amber Ale.

malthop

Categories: Amber Ale | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Triumph Brewing Amber Ale

Beer: Amber Ale
Brewery:
 Triumph Brewing Company
Style: American Amber Ale
ABV: 5.0%

20130119_155115

Serving Style: Draft
Drinking Establishment: Triumph Brewing Company, Princeton, NJ
Primary Consumer: Kerensa

——–

OVERALL RATING:

BEERUSEBEERUSEBEERUSE

Sight: Clear dark amber body with a wispy white head.

Smell: The prominent aromas are a deep, sweet apple malt and a full citrus hop.

Flavor: Oddly, it tastes like a German lager, with that doughy malt flavor. There is a trace of hops that provide some semblance of the bitterness an Amber Ale should have. However, it’s just kind of bland.

Feel: Its thin body and full carbonation make the mouthfeel a bit off for the style.

Concluding Remark: Triumph Brewing’s Amber Ale slightly misses the mark for the style, but is nevertheless wholly drinkable. If you wind up traveling through Princeton, Philadelphia, or New Hope, you should absolutely stop at each city’s respective Triumph. However, just don’t order the Amber Ale (or the Holy Smoke–a bizarre smoked British cask ale). Do go for the Bengali Gold IPA, though!

malthop

Categories: Amber Ale | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.